Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937)

snow white beautyLooking for love? Stick your head in a well and start singing.

 

In the 1930s, the Hollywood film industry was sure this movie would fail. In the 1990s, I was sure I wouldn’t drop my brand new gloves down the port-a-potty if I held them under my chin just right.

We were both wrong.

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, America’s first full-length animated feature, was wildly successful. It became the highest-grossing film ever (for about a year…and then that distinction was, as the title of its usurper would say, “gone with the wind”).

Walt Disney won an honorary Academy Award for “a significant screen innovation which has charmed millions and pioneered a great new entertainment field.” The award, presented by Shirley Temple, came in the form of one full-size Oscar plus seven miniature ones. (I don’t get it…)

The entire cast was uncredited, but most people probably wouldn’t recognize them anyway. One interesting thing is that Adriana Caselotti (Snow White) and Moroni Olsen (the magic mirror) both also had uncredited roles in It’s a Wonderful Life as the singer at Martini’s and the voice of the senior angel, respectively.

snow white seven dwarfsSnow White is obviously geared toward children, but just in case you haven’t seen it or don’t remember, the scene where the queen turns herself into the witch may be a little frightening for young kids. And just for the record, I want to know where the queen goes shopping to get all those potion ingredients. Have I just been missing the mummy dust aisles at Walmart? And when will I reach the point where I have “old hag’s cackle” just sitting around in a beaker?

Two other crucial things worth mentioning: Snow White sounds like a chipmunk (though I suppose that is to be expected when you’re fluent in Rodent), and is it “dwarfs” or “dwarves”? Either way, I feel guilty and politically incorrect.

OH, SOMETHING YOU SHOULD KNOW: I don’t care how many flower petals garnish a corpse…you couldn’t pay me to touch it, let alone kiss it. Besides, I already have like a million flasks of mummy dust.

The lesson for all of us in this film—aside from finding yourself a trustworthy apple retailer—is about what real beauty looks like.

Being clean and well-groomed is important, for sure, but an unhealthy obsession with our own appearance and how our attractiveness compares to others will eventually have the opposite effect.

What the queen would never understand is how crucial a core the intangible Christlike traits are to a person’s attractiveness. The most beautiful people in the world are those whose spirits are so strong, they can’t help but radiate an aura that makes us want to be around them.

“Behold, the virgin whom thou seest is the mother of the Son of God… most beautiful and fair above all other virgins.” — 1 Nephi 11:18,15

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2 Responses to Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937)

  1. John Rainier says:

    Perhaps the ultimate helpless female waiting for a prince to rescue her story . She literally does nothing to attract the prince, but lie there . The older I get , the more I wonder about what these Disney movies are teaching us .

    • Adam says:

      I see your point, but I also see the good in this film. I’d prefer 100 Snow Whites over most movies today that sexualize and objectify women.

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